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CONCLUSION

Viewing Collins & Aikman’s acknowledgment forms as acceptances under Subsection 2-207(1), we are initially faced with the question of whether the arbitration provision in Collins & Aikman’s acknowledgment forms were in fact “additional to or different from” the terms of The Carpet Mart’s oral offers. In the typical case under Section 2-207, there exist both a written purchase order and a written acknowledgment, and this determination can be readily made by comparing the two forms. In the present case, where the only written forms were Collins & Aikman’s sales acknowledgments, we believe that such a comparison must be made between the oral offers and the written acceptances. Although the District Court apparently assumed that The Carpet Mart’s oral orders did not include in their terms the arbitration provision which appeared in Collins & Aikman’s acknowledgment forms, we believe that a specific finding on this point will be required on remand.
Assuming, for purposes of analysis, that the arbitration provision was an addition to the terms of The Carpet Mart’s oral offers, we must next determine whether or not Collins & Aikman’s acceptances were “expressly made conditional on assent to the additional . . . terms” therein, within the proviso of Subsection 2-207(1). As set forth in full above, the provision appearing on the face of Collins & Aikman’s acknowledgment forms stated that the acceptances (or orders) were “subject to all of the terms and conditions on the face and reverse side hereof, including arbitration, all of which are accepted by buyer.

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