Login

Login

To access this feature, please Log In or Register for your Casebriefs Account.

Add to Library

Add

Search

Login
Register

Wilderness Watch v. Mainella

    Brief Fact Summary.

    Wilderness Watch sued the National Park Service (NPS) when the NPS continued to use motor vehicles on Cumberland Island after the island was classified as wilderness.

    Synopsis of Rule of Law.

    An agency’s interpretation of a statute will not be upheld if the agency’s interpretation of the statute conflicts with the intent of the statute.

    Facts.

    The Wilderness Act prevents motor vehicles from driving on federal land that have been classified as wilderness. Motor vehicles are only allowed on federal land classified as wilderness to enforce the Wilderness Act. Wilderness Watch sued the National Park Service (NPS) when the NPS continued to use motor vehicles on Cumberland Island after the island was classified as wilderness.Wilderness Watch sued the National Park Service (NPS) when the NPS continued to use motor vehicles on Cumberland Island after the island was classified as wilderness. The trial court granted summary judgment to the park service.

    Issue.

    Will an agency’s interpretation of a statute be upheld if the agency’s interpretation of the statute conflicts with the intent of the statute?

    Held.

    No. The judgment of the trial court is reversed. The use of the van by NPS is prohibited because it was being used for transportation, not administration; the motor vehicle in this instance was a passenger van being used to transport people.

    Discussion.

    An agency’s interpretation of a statute will not be upheld if the agency’s interpretation of the statute conflicts with the intent of the statute. The Wilderness Act bars use of motor vehicles except for the administration of the Wilderness Act.


    Create New Group

      Casebriefs is concerned with your security, please complete the following